THE REFORMATION AND IMMIGRANT

DEEELLL.jpg Rondell Treviño, President & Founder, Memphis immigration Project

October 31st marks the 500th anniversary of the 16th century Protestant Reformation.

Roused to action by the corruption and abuses they saw in the Roman Catholic church of the time, visionary pastors and leaders like Martin Luther and John Calvin spearheaded a movement that transformed Christianity and eventually led to the emergence of the Protestant denominations that exist today.

The Reformers were guided by the conviction that the church of their day had drifted away from the essential, original teachings of Christianity, especially in regard to what it was teaching about salvation—how people can be forgiven of sin through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and receive eternal life with God. The Reformation sought to re-orient Christianity on the original message of Jesus and the early church.

The Five Solas are five Latin phrases (or slogans) that emerged during the Reformation to summarize the Reformers’ theological convictions about the essentials of Christianity.

The Five Solas are:

  1. Sola Scriptura (“Scripture alone”): The Bible alone is our highest authority.
  2. Sola Fide (“faith alone”): We are saved through faith alone in Jesus Christ.
  3. Sola Gratia (“grace alone”): We are saved by the grace of God alone.
  4. Solus Christus (“Christ alone”): Jesus Christ alone is our Lord, Savior, and King.
  5. Soli Deo Gloria (“to the glory of God alone”): We live for the glory of God alone.

During the month of October, Memphis immigration Project will write five articles on each of the Five Solas to honor the Reformation’s anniversary, but also explaining why and how each of the Five Solas relates to the Immigrant.

 

Memphis immigration Project is a faith-based non-profit organization that exists to inspire the Christian community and people of good will to love their Immigrant neighbor.

 

Memphis immigration Project

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